Opinion

For the sake of the 51 million people

Military MPs discuss constitutional amendment during the Union Parliament session held on July 2 (Photo – EMG)

The effort towards constitutional amendment is still unsuccessful in the Parliament.

The people understand that the 2008 Constitution cannot be modified as easily as expected. But some are hopeful that there might be a chance to escape from the existing political dilemma.

Charter change, the army’s stance and bleak prospect for peace

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Unelected military representatives turned down the bill to amend the Constitution on June 25 and then on July 1 they unanimously said the controversial Section 436(b) should remain unchanged. The failure to change sections 261, 262 and 264 is a particular blow to ethnic communities.

Section 261, in particular, is glued to centralisation, and these sections are seen as key to blocking the development of a federal union.

Words of those who attended the EMG’s briefing on the lawsuit against 17 editors filed by information ministry

Words of those who attended the EMG’s briefing on the lawsuit against 17 editors filed by information ministry.

Phoe Thauk Kyar, a veteran journalist

Some are trying to disappoint the people by threatening that like in the 1990 election, power would not be transferred, that the upcoming election would be fraudulent and that they would only win the election. Don’t believe it. That’s not possible at all.

Some are trying to disappoint the people by threatening that like in the 1990 election, power would not be transferred, that the upcoming election would be fraudulent and that they would only win the election. Don’t believe it. That’s not possible at all. Now we have the conditions different from those in 1990.

 

The speech of EMG’s CEO Dr. Than Htut Aung at the briefing over the issue of a lawsuit filed by Ministry of Information against 17 editors from the Daily Eleven.

President Thein Sein as U Sein Win saw him

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September 30, 2011. It was Friday. I used to go to the home of late veteran journalist Lu Du U Sein Win on every Friday. I speak with him before getting to the newsroom. But that day was different. I arrived early. I had not talked much as I had an event to cover.
 

The peace process beyond Law Khee Lar

The road to peace, on which the current Myanmar government embarked in 2011, has been all but smooth. After four years of negotiations, seven meetings between the UPWC and NCCT, a signed national ceasefire agreement draft and four ethnic armed organisation summits to discuss ratifying that agreement, Myanmar remains in an official state of conflict.
 

Do Tin Aye’s words meet the six qualities of an elder?

There is a propaganda song I still remember for I have heard it several times in last 15-20 years.

That song's main verse goes, "We don't care economic sanctions. Our land has abundant natural resources".

The song namely 'Myanmar’s will' was written by a writer under a pseudonym 'Do Ye Baw' and sung by Yebaw (private) Naing Win.

It was said that former General Khin Nyunt made the state-run media broadcast the song repeatedly.

USDP’s central consultant urges party to choose between receiving hatred from dishonest minority or sacrifice the party

The Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP)’s central consultant Tin Htut has recently urged the party to choose between receiving hatred from the minority [in the party] that has been acting dishonestly or sacrifice the party.

Tin Htut’s appraisal was included in an article titled “What is the Future of the Party’s Central Committee Chairman U Thura Shwe Mann, the future USDP’s presidential candidate, and U Thein Sein?” written by Maung Yay Set and published in the Myanmar Thandawsint (The Myanmar Herald) journal on Friday.

Untie the knot

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When I watched the movie ‘Selma’ which was nominated for several Oscar and Golden Globe Awards, my favorite scene was Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. talking to President Johnson.

When King came to meet him, the president explained poverty eradication projects for the African-Americans.

Myanmar is neither Asia's common slave nor dumpster

Myanmar has been strongly blamed over the issue of boat-riding refugees trapped in the Southeast Asian sea (especially around Andaman Sea and Straits of Malacca).

Human traffickers have long been using the Southeast Asian waters. Concerned countries have ignored this issue. But the inhumane acts committed in early May caught the attention of the international community.

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