Trump starts Asia trip, to work with China to promote peace, prosperity

Writer: 
China Daily/ANN
US President Donald Trump speaks to the media before boarding Marine One departing the White House for Joint Base Andrews, in Washington DC, the United States, on Nov 3, 2017. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

WASHINGTON - US National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster said Thursday that US President Donald Trump looks forward to his upcoming visit to China and is ready to work with Beijing to promote peace and prosperity in the region and beyond.

China is "an immensely important part of ... regional security as well as protecting and advancing the systems that have benefitted all of us," McMaster told reporters.

"These are really the rule-based security, economic, political and diplomatic organizations and systems that emerged after the bloodiest war in human history in the previous century," he added. "We have to really work hard to preserve and advance what has lifted so many people out of poverty, and what has prevented great-power conflict for 70 years. We cannot take it for granted."

"So I know the president is committed to working with China, with President Xi in particular, and with all leaders in the region, to make sure that for the next 70 years, we enjoy a degree of prosperity and security we've enjoyed over the past 70 years," he said.

Trump will start his 12-day Asia trip on Friday to Japan, South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines. He will participate in a string of multilateral engagements like the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Economic Leaders' Meeting and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations summit in the last two legs of the trip.

Special arrangements set for Trump's visit

China will make high-standard arrangements for the reception of US President Donald Trump and fully prepare to ensure that the upcoming visit will be historic and successful, said a senior diplomat.

Trump's visit to China from Wednesday to Friday will be the first by a head of state to China since the Communist Party of China's 19th National Congress, which ended on Oct 24, and it comes at a significant moment in China-US relations, said Zheng Zeguang, vice-foreign minister.

Apart from regular arrangements such as a welcoming ceremony, formal talks, reception banquet and meeting with the media, China has also set some informal interaction procedures that will provide sufficient time for the two presidents to fully exchange views on major issues that jointly concern the two sides, Zheng said.

In April, when President Xi Jinping visited Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, Trump arranged for a considerate and grand reception for Xi, and in return, China will also make some special arrangements for the US president, Zheng added.

According to the vice-minister, the two presidents will exchange views on hot topics such as bilateral trade and the Korean Peninsula nuclear issue.

Zheng said he is optimistic about the future of China-US trade, since there is great potential for economic cooperation between the world's two largest economies.

"The core of China-US economic and trade ties is win-win cooperation," he said, adding that two-way cargo trade volume reached $524.3 billion last year.

China-US economic and trade relations created 2.6 million jobs for the United States in 2015 and saved $850 for each US family on average during the same period, he said.

China and the US are in different positions of the global supply chain, and the two countries have complementary economies, he said, adding that China has a surplus in cargo trade but a deficit in service trade with the US.

The vice-minister also reiterated China's stance on the Korean Peninsula nuclear issue, saying that China upholds dialogue and coordination to solve the issue and opposes any use of force.

On Thursday, US National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster said in Washington that Trump looks forward to his upcoming visit to China and is ready to work with Beijing to promote peace and prosperity in the region and beyond.

China is "an immensely important part of ... regional security as well as protecting and advancing the systems that have benefited all of us," McMaster told reporters.