Opinion

Ceasefire dream uncertain ahead of election

The Union Peacemaking Work Committee (UPWC) and the ethnic group's Senior Delegation met from July 22 to 24, talking about the ceasefire deal but the meeting finished inconclusive.

Both sides said generally that the meeting was successful. But it was just a diplomatic answer and there left some important points to talk on and that is why the deal is still unsigned.     

Even if the July meeting is opening one door for the nationwide ceasefire agreement (NCA), there are still many doors left closed, sealed with bigger bolts.

Keep a watchful eye on Kayah State

 

The Union Election Commission (UEC) officially allows the government officers to start election campaign on July 8.

It looks like the members of the executive body made the most of the chance to begin campaigns two months prior to other political parties. They held campaigns both directly and indirectly.

The right to election campaign and seeking the upper hand

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The Union Election Commission (UEC) released three statements on July 8. The statements announce the upcoming election would take place on November 8, set the dates of registration and scrutinising candidates, and state that it had allowed the government officials to launch election campaign.

All of the contents of the announcement contain interesting factors, especially allowing the government officials to canvass for votes 60 days earlier than other political parties.

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For the sake of the 51 million people

Military MPs discuss constitutional amendment during the Union Parliament session held on July 2 (Photo – EMG)

The effort towards constitutional amendment is still unsuccessful in the Parliament.

The people understand that the 2008 Constitution cannot be modified as easily as expected. But some are hopeful that there might be a chance to escape from the existing political dilemma.

Charter change, the army’s stance and bleak prospect for peace

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Unelected military representatives turned down the bill to amend the Constitution on June 25 and then on July 1 they unanimously said the controversial Section 436(b) should remain unchanged. The failure to change sections 261, 262 and 264 is a particular blow to ethnic communities.

Section 261, in particular, is glued to centralisation, and these sections are seen as key to blocking the development of a federal union.

Words of those who attended the EMG’s briefing on the lawsuit against 17 editors filed by information ministry

Words of those who attended the EMG’s briefing on the lawsuit against 17 editors filed by information ministry.

Phoe Thauk Kyar, a veteran journalist

Some are trying to disappoint the people by threatening that like in the 1990 election, power would not be transferred, that the upcoming election would be fraudulent and that they would only win the election. Don’t believe it. That’s not possible at all.

Some are trying to disappoint the people by threatening that like in the 1990 election, power would not be transferred, that the upcoming election would be fraudulent and that they would only win the election. Don’t believe it. That’s not possible at all. Now we have the conditions different from those in 1990.

 

The speech of EMG’s CEO Dr. Than Htut Aung at the briefing over the issue of a lawsuit filed by Ministry of Information against 17 editors from the Daily Eleven.

President Thein Sein as U Sein Win saw him

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September 30, 2011. It was Friday. I used to go to the home of late veteran journalist Lu Du U Sein Win on every Friday. I speak with him before getting to the newsroom. But that day was different. I arrived early. I had not talked much as I had an event to cover.
 

The peace process beyond Law Khee Lar

The road to peace, on which the current Myanmar government embarked in 2011, has been all but smooth. After four years of negotiations, seven meetings between the UPWC and NCCT, a signed national ceasefire agreement draft and four ethnic armed organisation summits to discuss ratifying that agreement, Myanmar remains in an official state of conflict.
 

Do Tin Aye’s words meet the six qualities of an elder?

There is a propaganda song I still remember for I have heard it several times in last 15-20 years.

That song's main verse goes, "We don't care economic sanctions. Our land has abundant natural resources".

The song namely 'Myanmar’s will' was written by a writer under a pseudonym 'Do Ye Baw' and sung by Yebaw (private) Naing Win.

It was said that former General Khin Nyunt made the state-run media broadcast the song repeatedly.

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